Allen Antiques

1640

A composed half suit of the Cromwellian era. Composed of a good lobster-tailed pot and a breast and back with integral collar. Helmet bowl formed in one piece with raised lines radiating from the center. Articulated tail formed of 4 plates each with rolled outer edges. Secured at the sides by articulating rivets and with the remains of a central leather. 2 cheekplaces with rolled edges and central perforation. Brim fixed to the bowl. Sliding nasal secured by a turn-screw with large flattened head. The center of the bowl has a loop secured through a round washer. Leather strips for securing the lining remain around the tail, cheek plates and bowl. Breast and back rough from the hammer with inward-turned rolls at the neck and arms of the breast and neck,arms and base of the waist flare on the back. Breast with 2 proof marks, most likely pistol given the moderate weight of the breast and minimal depth of the dents. All 3 parts marked. Breast with several marks. The first is the A surmounted by a helmet used by the London Armourer's company between 1650 and 1660 during the inter-regnum. The others less distinct but probably an R - attributed to Francis Rolenson/Rawlinson - to the left of the crease, the last even less distinct, possibly MM. The inside is marked twice with paint, '219' and what appears to be '9R'. Back marked with a L on the collar and the number 2188 below the right shoulder strap. The L is a common mark on English armours, but not currently attributed. The helmet is marked with an M at the point of the brim on the outside and a broad V on the inside of the brim. The breastplate is certainly of English manufacture. The back is associated and is probably English. The marks on the helmet resemble the marks used by the London Armourer's company, but the one piece form is more typical of the continent and is possibly of German manufacture. Shoulder plates and waist belt replaced. Together with a modern copy of a buff coat and an inferior modern elbow gauntlet. For more information on armours and marks of the London Armourers see The London Armourers of the 17th Century by Thom Richardson.



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