Allen Antiques

Details of the infantry cuirass c. 1550 converted from a cavalry breastplate originally made c. 1515
Breastplate

The breastplate is of heavier construction than the back. It is decorated with incised lines that match the backplate, with the addition of a heart below the upper center. The main plate is 12 1/2\" high. The waist lame is 2\" above the center line and 1 1/2\" below. It is agressively flaired to match the breast and fauld. The fauld is formed of 3 upward lapping lames. Each has a point over the sliding rivets at the side and rises slightly at the center. The bottom plate has a small inward roll on its bottom edge. Close inspection of the lames of the fauld shows signs of cusping at the center of the upper edges of the plates and the remains of a central spray of flutes. The very straight form of the profile of the fauld confirms the assumption that the fauld was originally a late 15th c. German culet. This breastplate illustrates the adaptation of older pieces of armour to bring them up-to-date.

Not for sale.

gusset

The gussets are edged by outward turned triangular rolls. They are attached by 2 rivets (one top, one bottom). They do not move. Inspection of the gussets indicates that the gussets were probably originally part of the main breastplate, which have been cut out and re-attached to form gussets.

Not for sale.

breast and back plates

Shows the decorative elements on the breast. Triple lines at the top and pairs of lines around the arm holes and radiating from the waist. This also shows signs of older sprays of flutes that have been hammered out to "modernize" the breastplate. Careful inspection also shows that there were holes for a lance rest, which have been filled to convert the breast to infantry use.

Not for sale.

profile

Profile of the breastplate. Similar to profiles normal for the mid century, but not really the most stylish. It is, however, exactly the profile of earlier 16th c. globose breastplates.

Not for sale.

neck roll

The neck roll is rolled outward in a triangular shape. The upper facet of the roll is decorated with diagonal filed lines similar to the roping that is often present on rolls of the mid 16th century. The form of this roll is typical of armour of the 1st and second decade of the 16th c. They would not normally be filed in this way.

Not for sale.

backplate

Backplate formed of 3 pieces. The main plate covering the majority of the back. Small upper plate attached by 3 sliding rivets. Upper plate has a small inward roll rising to a central point and at the ends. The space between the uper and side rolls (at the shoulders) is decorated with filed notches. The waist lame is also atached by 3 sliding rivets. It is flaired below the waist and rolled at the botton edge. It is decorated overall with incised lines. There are triple lines along the neck and arm holes. There are triple lines down the center of the back. There ae 4 additional pairs of lines radiating from the waist to the shoulders and center of the arm holes. There are 2 holes at each shoulder and one hole on each side of the waist lame for attachment of straps (now missing) The backplate appears to have been cleaned, at which time the rivets have been replaced.

Not for sale.

inside back

Upper lame is 3 inches high at its tallest points (near the ends). It is scalloped to form points at the sliding rivets on the bottom edge. It is scalloped on the upper edge to form a point in the center and to rise up at the ends. Upper edge formed into a narrow inward roll.

Not for sale.

inside back

Waist lame is 2 3/4\" high above the waist crease and 1 1/4\" high below the waist. It is attached to the main plate by 3 sliding rivets. Slots are rectangular in form. The edges of the waist lame are scalloped to form points at the rivets. There is a small inward roll at the bottom edge.

Not for sale.




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This site last updated Fri Feb 13 08:22:06 EST 2009