Allen Antiques

These are the Gorgets in the Allen study collection.
Gorget

Gorget circa 1515-1520

Italian. 'Alla Tedesca'. Formed of 2 large main plates, one front and back. Neck formed of 3 lames front and back the uppermost with large, heavily roped roll. The other 2 with closely-set flutes. Main plates with embossed ridge at the outer edge, recessed border, closely set flutes, a wide area with engraved decoration and a narrow embossed, roped ridge at the neck. Front and back secured by integral hinge on the left and pin on the right. Small patches. Leathers replaced. Previously sold at Sotheby's New York European Works of Art, Arms and Armour, Tapestries and Furniture June 1, 1991 Lot 480. Arms A-128 part of the same lot. 11 in wide at the front and 13 5/8 in. wide at the back.Top roll 6 in. wide and 6 1/4 in front to back. Thickness .030-.052 in. Weight 2 pounds 12 ounces (1245 g).

Not for sale.

Gorget

Gorget circa 1520

North Italian. Possibly composed. Main plates of wide, squared form for use with a shorter breastplate with a straight upper edge. The neck lames secured to the main plates in an atypical manner - with sliding rivets. The top plates with plain, angular inward turn. The top plates may be associated. Overall old blued finish with traces of gilding. Very similar in construction to gorget illustrated on plate 188 of L'Arte Dell'Armatura in Italia.

Not for sale.

Almain collar

Almain collar circa 1540

Three plates front and rear. Upper plates with inward turned, roped border at the neck (turn at least somewhat of jelly-roll form and fine very angular roping), secured by an integral hinge on the left and pin on the right (there are two holes on the right side, the top one secured to the rear plate and engaging the hole in the front plate). Main front and rear plates with triple raised lines curving up to a central point. Originally part of an almain collar, right side with a turning hook to secure the leather for the right shoulder. Cleaned and re-blacked. Together with (detached) shoulder defense for the left shoulder of 6 plates. The lower plate with an inward turned ropped roll, buckle and raised flutes ensuite with the main plates. All aparently originally finished bright. Collar cleaned, re-leathered and with modern blackened finish. Shoulder cleaned and preserved but not restored. Remains of old leather at the front and center. The center of the front of the gorget and the shoulder creased, edges beveled and notched at the center. Buckle mounted to the front of the lower shoulder plate with a decorated plate. There is a slot behind the buckle which was probably used to secure the end of the strap. The shoulder plates of typical form - the top plate basically flat, the next dished more than the others, the next 3 lightly dished. The bottom plate slightly dished in the back half. From the Armoury of the Princely House of Hohenlohe-Langenburg, removed from Schloss Langenburg. Painted on the inside of the front and back plates of the gorget with inventory number 444.

Not for sale.

German Gorget

German Gorget circa 1550

Formed of 3 plates front and back with additional plates covering the points of the shoulders. Main front plate with central crease. Main rear plate formed to the shape of the neck and shoulders. Neck tof two lames front and back. Upper plates with srong inward-turned roped rolls. Neck lames creased at the center front following the crease in the main plate. Neck lames attached by 3 leathers front and back, each secured by 2 rivets in each plate. Upper plate secured by an integral hinge at the left and a pin at the right. Main plates secured by a pin at the left and a pin engaging in a keyhole slot at the right. Attached shoulder protection of two plates each. One a small articulating plate, the other shaped to cover the point of the shoulder. Edge rolled and roped. Secured with sliding rivets at the back and leathers at the center and front edge. The leather on the right can be detached from the main plate to allow the gorget to be opened. Two hinged mounts for the suspension of the pauldrons, each carrying a vertical pin with a spring-loaded catch. One associated. Older leathers. A pair of holes at the base of the center of the rear main plate.

Top of neck slightly out of round. App 6 1/2 inches across on the inside (app. 1/4"" longer front to back than side to side). The main plates are 10 1/4 inches wide at the front, 11 1/2 inches wide at the join between the front and back plates and 13 1/4 inches wide at the back. Overall thickness varies between 0.03 in. and 0.050 in. It is generally around 0.040 in. thick.

Not for sale.

Munions

Munions circa 1550-1600

gorget of 3 plates front and back. The main plates rough from the hammer and blackened with raised crescent decoration on each side. Neck plates polished, upper plate with a bold inward turn. Shoulders of 6 plates the second shaped to the point of the shoulder, the final plate with inward turned roped roll at the bottom. Bottom plates blackened with central raised polished band and terminal plates decorated en-suite with the main gorget plates with raised polished crescents.

Not for sale.

Gorget

Gorget circa 1560

South German, probably Augsburg. Of bright steel composed of 4 plates front and back. The top one with inwardly-turned and roped roll, the bottom one drawn down to a blunt point in the front. Hinged on the left side with an integral hinge in the top collar plate and a rivet n the main plates. Secured by a rivet on the rear plate engaging a keyhole in the front plate and two pins engaging holes in the upper plate on the right. Two pins are relatively rare. This may be to keep the upper plates aligned perfectly if the collar is meant to engage a roll on the bottom of the helmet. The upper one is secured to the rear plate and engages a hole in the front plate, the lower one is secured to the front plate and engages a hole in the rear plate. The top corners of the second rear plate are notched to allow the gorget to open, the plates to fit nicely and still allow for an overlap. With brass-capped rivets throughout. The rivets that secure the straps for the pauldrons are modern. The other rivets may be original, which would make the leathers original. Possibly some form of mark on the main front plate. Very nice form with tapering neck plates. The gorget includes two straps for securing the pauldrons which appear to be later replacements. Details of the contruction including the difference in thickness between the front and back plates, the double pins, beveled edges, inset hinge, brass capped rivet heads and finished edges of the inner plates indicate this likely formed part of a high quality armour. This is very similar to the gorget on Wallace A45 catalogued as A45.02.

Ex. Coll. Peter Parsons (2011), Robin Wigington (1977), Part of a South German armour sold by Sotheby , Co. London 12 Feb. 1974, lot 172.

10 3/4 in wide at the back, 8 3/4 in wide at the front. Thickness varies on the front main plate between 0.070 in. and 0.095 in. It is generally in the 0.080 in. range. The main rear plate is thinner - 0.040 in. to 0.055 in, mostly .040-050.

Weight: 2 pounds 8 ounces (1,130 g)

Not for sale.

Italian Gorget

Italian Gorget circa 1580

Gorget of two main plates with single neck-lames at the front and rear. The outer edges of the main plates are bordered by a half roll and recessed border, the laf roll roped. The neck edge of the main plates with matching roped half-rolls. The neck plates with roped full rolls. The neck plates are secured by an internal hinge at the left and a pin in the rear plate engaging a hole in the front plate on the right. The main plates are secured by a turning hook on the right which engages in a keyhole slot. Very similar to that on Corselet II.47 in the Royal Armouries (illustrated on plate LIX in European Armour in the Tower of London). Top of collar 6 in. wide and 6 3/16 in front to back. 11 1/4 in. wide at the widest part of the back. Thickess of the main plate generally .030-.040, the collar plate .020-.030. Weight 1 pound 9.6 ounces (725g).

Not for sale.

Gorget

Gorget circa 1580

Composed of a single plate front and rear of rounded form. Decorated with etched cabled bands filled with trophies-or-armour in the style typically described as 'Pisan'. Patches at the ends of the front plate at the pivot and closure. Originally would have had an additional pair of small neck plates.

Not for sale.

Front plate from a Gorget

Front plate from a Gorget circa 1590

Rounded form with an inward turn on the edge and a narrow flare at the neck.

Not for sale.

Gorget

Gorget circa 1600

Gorget. Formerly part of a pair of munions. Formed of 2 plates, one front and one rear, attached by a rivet on the left and keyhole on the right. Smooth finish. Rolled edge at the neck hole. Neck hole unusually wide with almost no rise at the neck. Originally part of a black and white munion (signs of the bands are visible on the inside and traces on the outside).

Not for sale.

Gorget

Gorget circa 1600

Formed of one large main plate front and rear with two neck lames front and rear. The upper neck lame with an inward-turned rolled and ropped upper edge. The upper plates secured by an integral hinge on the left and a pin engaging a hole on the right. Expertly releathered with buff leather.

Not for sale.

Gorget Rear Plate

Gorget Rear Plate circa 1600

Single plate with inward turn at the neck and lower edge. Bordered by double engraved lines and brass capped iron lining rivets. Additional double engraved line at the center. Rusted. From the Armoury of the Princely House of Hohenlohe-Langenburg, removed from Schloss Langenburg.

Not for sale.

Munions

Munions circa 1610

two piece collar with five piece shoulders. Collar comprising main plate front and rear raised to form an integral neck protection with inward turned plain roll, pointed front-plate hinged on the left and retained by a stud and a keyhole slot on the right, and with spaudlers of five downward-lapping lames, the bottom lames each with turned and roped border. The shoulders are well shaped to the body, broadening out at the top 2 lames. As is typical, the top lame is relatively narrow and flat, the next one larger and shaped to the point of the shoulder, the next two are nearly flat and the last plate is cusped in to fit to the arm. Appears to have originally had a bright polished surface. Signs of the rough grind or file work remain on many plates. There are a number of similar pieces that have come out of the Solothurn arsenal that have survived in very good condition. The grind marks on this piece may show how the piece was originally finished. Shoulder plates secured by sliding rivets at the rear and leathers at the center and front. Shoulders attached to the gorget with a short leather strap at the back and extensions of the central and front leathers. The right side can be removed from the gorget to allow the piece to be put on. A slot in the end of the leather engages a rivet head on the inside of the gorget. Leathers and buckles replaced. Some signs of remnants of older coatings that helped to maintain the material. All parts fit well and are likely original to each other even though the rolls at the base of the shoulders are roped and the neck roll is plain.

Not for sale.

Pikeman's Gorget

Pikeman's Gorget circa 1620

Of single hinged plate front and rear, secured by a rivet on the left side and a keyhole slot engaging a rivet on the right. Low collar with a very narrow outward turned roll and hollow roll at the outer edge. Lining rivets with flush outer heads along the lower edge and along the neck. Decorated with light incised lines. Cleaned and re-blackened. From the Armoury of the Princely House of Hohenlohe-Langenburg, removed from Schloss Langenburg. Painted on the inside with inventory number 443.

Not for sale.

Gorget

Gorget early 17th c.

German. Formed of one plate front and rear, each flaired at the neck to form a narrow collar. Outer edge and neck with plain inward-turned rolls. The neck bordered by rivets with flush external heads securing a leather band in the front (the band is lost from the rear plate). The front plate is much longer than is usual, this gorget was intended to be worn without a breastplate - either with a buff coat or over civilian clothing. The outer edges are bordered by brass capped lining rivets securing cicakills of crimson velvet bordered by gold thread. Some losses to the piccadils, esp. to the right rear. Lightly pitted and patinated. These early 17th c. gorgets designed to be used without other body armour are discussed on page 56 and illustrated on page 57 of Harnisch und Helm, a book on the subject of the Graz arsenal. This is an example of what they say was called a French ring collar which is described as having been made for officers. This gorget shares the particular features, being extended in the front and surrounded by a velvet border.

Not for sale.

Gorget

Gorget early 17th c.

German. Possibly Nuremberg. Rough from the hammer. Rolled neck and outer edge, both bordered by rivets carrying the remains of leather bands. Shape original. Signs of later enhancement by the addition of engraved bands with patterns. These are light, surface lines.

Not for sale.

Gorget

Gorget early 17th c.

German. One piece front and back with integral raised collar. Neck and outer edge with plain inward turns bordered by round head lining rivets with round internal washers securing a lining band. Traces of engraved decoration scored through a formerly blued finish.

Not for sale.




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This site last updated Mon Jun 12 19:11:15 EDT 2017